Monthly Archives: March 2009

Is social media turning mainstream?

When I was at PodCamp Toronto 2009, a thought occurred to me amid the lively, p2p discussions: social media feels like it’s nearing the end of its indie phase. By that I mean it’s being embraced (or at least considered) by a lot of folks who wouldn’t call themselves early adopters. We’re certainly reading about it in MSM. And clients are asking how it works. And that’s not a bad thing. It’s a rite of passage for most independent movements that really catch fire (think music, movies, writing…). Companies are beginning to see that more and more of their customers…

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Writing in Twitterese – a blog post in 17 tweets

I’m trying an experiment: writing a blog post composed of 140 character paragraphs (or less) to see if Twitter supports longer-form thoughts. I’m checking each paragraph in Twitter – to make sure it doesn’t exceed the limit. And, I’m trying to adhere to CP style too. Here goes: Lately, there’s been much ado about Twitter in mainstream media. It feels like you can’t open a newspaper without reading about it. This week alone, the Globe and Mail had stories by Sarah Hampson, Margaret Wente and Ian Brown. So what does it mean? I think it shows that yet another social…

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Clearing the Air (Canada)

Last summer, I posted about my first experience with the new Air Canada electronic boarding pass (eBP) that was sent directly to my BB. At the time, it wasn’t that well recognized by airport security and was difficult to scan. I reverted to printing it the old fashioned way. So I was a little taken aback when, two weeks ago, I got a message from Darcy Noonan, who works for AC as a ‘customer service platform manager, ecommerce’. He said he’d read my blog and, though it was published in the summer, wanted to talk about my concerns. He followed…

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SocialCorp – the company ‘social’

Nearly every day, I’m asked about social media and how businesses can jump into the fray. Lately, I’ve been referring people who want to learn more to SocialCorp – Social Media Goes Corporate, a great new book by Joel Postman. Joel is a former corporate speechwriter, PR practitioner and consultant who recently joined Intridea. I first met Joel when he led a session on social media for Counselors Academy and found him to be knowledgeable, witty and somewhat skeptical; an early adopter with a balanced view. All of this comes through in his book, which is clearly written and, unlike…

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Good counsel: Counselors Academy 2009

When I started Palette five years ago, I asked Pat McNamara, president and founder of Apex PR, for some advice. And she suggested that I should join an organization called Counselors Academy, which comprised agency owners and principals and had a not-to-be-missed conference every spring. I wasn’t able to make it that first year, but I’ve been faithfully attending ever since and I have to say it’s one of the best things I’ve done in PR. The conference is about all things agency with sessions on strategies for running and growing your business, finding and motivating your team, becoming more…

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Rupert Pupkin lives – but not necessarily on Skittles

Last week, I re-watched Martin Scorcese’s piercingly funny, King of Comedy, where two psychotically-obsessed fans (Robert De Niro and Sandra Bernhard) kidnap a popular late night talk show host (Jerry Lewis). The reason? For Bernhard it’s love. For De Niro (aka Rupert Pupkin), it’s because he wants to appear on the show and become famous. Pupkin has a modicum talent and spends his days practising in the faux talk show set he built in his basement. He’s not interested in pursuing the paying-your-dues route; playing clubs, honing his act. He wants a quick hit. And (scene spoiler…) when he gets…

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